Full Text Downloads

 

This part of the website includes resources for values-based practice that you are free to download for your own use in training, in developing services or in research

The resources available include Training Materials, Practice Guidance, Policy Reports and Literature Searching

We are grateful to those concerned for their generosity in making these materials available and would ask that you kindly acknowledge their origins in any use you make of them
Full citation references are given after each download


Training Materials


 Whose Values? A Workbook

Whose Values workbook

‘Whose Values?’ is based on work by Kim Woodbridge-Dodd, Bill Fulford, Malcolm King, Toby Williamson and others at the Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health in London

Launched by Rosie Winterton, the Minister of State with Responsibility for Mental Health, in 2004, ‘Whose Values?’ went on to become the basis for a series of values-based and evidence-based policies and practice guidance in mental health from the UK Department of Health (see Reading Guide)

‘Whose Values?’ provides a series of practical and case-based exercises exploring each of the main process elements of values-based practice. It can be used for group work or individual study
Download Whose Values? A Workbook
Citation Reference:
Woodbridge, K., and Fulford, K.W.M. (2004) ‘Whose Values?’ A workbook for values-based practice in mental health care. London: The Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health.


Valores de Quem? Brazilian-Portugese Translation of ‘Whose Values?’ by Arthur Maciel (translator)

Valores de quem
This is a Brazilian translation of the full text of ‘Whose Values?’. The translator, Arthur Maciel, is a psychiatrist who worked on the translation with Kim Woodbridge-Dodd and Bill Fulford during a visit to the UK in 2011.
Download Valores de quem?
Citation reference:
Maciel, A., (2012) Valores de Quem? Brazilian-Portugese translation of Woodbridge, K., and Fulford, K.W.M. (2004) ‘Whose Values?’ A workbook for values-based practice

 


Who Needs Values?
Approaching Values-based Practice in Medical Education
Instructors Manual
Jennifer Chevinsky
Who needs Values
‘Who Needs Values’ is an interactive seven-module (total of five hour and fifteen minutes) curriculum for teaching values-based practice to medical students. This values-based practice longitudinal curriculum aims not only to enhance students’ understanding of values within the healthcare field, but also to highlight the connection between evidence-based practice and other important topics such as cultural competency, bioethics, medical anthropology, public health, interdisciplinary teamwork, motivational interviewing, and simulation within a values framework.

Each module contains an Instructor’s Guide, Learner’s Guide, and a Valuable Resource document in addition to Cases that can be found at the end of the manual.

The manual is based on work that Jennifer Chevinsky completed during a six-week medical student placement with Bill Fulford and Ed Peile in Oxford and Warwick Universities.
Download Who Needs Values?
Citation reference:
Chevinsky, J., Fulford, KWM (Bill), Peile, E., and Monroe, A., (2015) Who Needs Values?
Approaching Values-based Practice in Medical Education – Instructors Manual


A Teaching and Learning Framework
Ed Peile
A Teaching and Learning Framework
This Teaching and Learning Framework, which was developed by Ed Peile, was published originally as an Appendix to Fulford, Peile and Carroll’s Essentials of Values-based Practice.
It provides color-coded learning criteria for each of the key process elements of values-based practice together with suggestions for appropriate assessment methods
Download A Teaching and Learning Framework
Citation reference:
Fulford, K.W.M., Peile, E., and Carroll, H (2012) Values-based practice teaching framework. Appendix B, pps 208 – 210 in Fulford, K.W.M., Peile, E., and Carroll, H Essentials of Values-based Practice: clinical stories linking science with people. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press


Practice Guidance


3 Keys to a Shared Approach in Mental Health Assessment

3 Keys to a Shared ApproachThe 3 Keys to a shared approach in mental health assessment came out of a wide-ranging consultation among service users and service providers sponsored by the UK’s Department of Health. The program was co-led by Laurie Bryant, Lu Duhig and Bill Fulford, the Department Leads at the time respectively for Service User (Laurie) and Carer (Lu) Perspectives and for Values-based Practice (Bill).

Besides defining the eponymous 3 Keys the document gives a rich variety of examples of good practice in mental health assessment under often challenging practical circumstances. These examples are the basis of on-going work by the Bristol Co-Production Group.
Download Three Keys to a Shared Approach
For a description of the 3 Keys Program and recent follow-up work building on its co-     productive approach, see:
Fulford, K.W.M., Duhig, L., Hankin, J., Hicks, J., and Keeble, J.(forthcoming, 2015) Values-based Assessment in Mental Health: The 3 Keys to a Shared Approach between Service Users and Service Providers. Ch 73, in Sadler, J.Z., van Staden, W., and Fulford, K.W.M., (Eds) The Oxford Handbook of Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press
[Available also (from July 2015) to purchase as a free-standing chapter from www.oxfordhandbooks.com]
Citation reference:
National Institute for Mental Health in England (NIMHE) and the Care Services Improvement Partnership (2008) 3 Keys to a Shared Approach in Mental Health Assessment. London: Department of Health


Foundation Module for the Workbook to support Implementation of the Mental health Act 2007
Training Manual Mental Health Act
This is the Foundation Module for a suite of materials produced by the Department of health in the UK to support implementation of the then recently launched Mental Health Act 2007.

The 2007 Act covers the highly contentious area of involuntary psychiatric treatment. The Foundation Module set out a values-based approach to involuntary treatment. ‘Values-based decision making’ in this case means balanced decisions being taken on individual cases within a framework of shared values provided by a set of Guiding Principles defined in the associated Code of Practice and sanctioned by the Act itself.

The Module sets out this approach and gives a number of self-test exercises and worked examples.
Download MHA Foundation Workbook
For an account of how the Foundation Module was co-produced between service users and service providers and the challenges of making the approach work in practice, see
Fulford, K.W.M., Dewey, S., and King, M.(forthcoming, 2015) Values-based Involuntary Seclusion and Treatment: Value Pluralism and the UK’s Mental Health Act 2007. Ch 60, in Sadler, J.Z., van Staden, W., and Fulford, K.W.M., (Eds) The Oxford Handbook of Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press
[Available to purchase as a free-standing chapter from www.oxfordhandbooks.com]
Citation reference:
Care Services Improvement Partnership (CSIP) and the National Institute for Mental Health in England (NIMHE) (2008) Workbook to Support Implementation of the Mental Health Act 1983 as Amended by the Mental Health Act 2007. London: Department of Health.


Values Based Practice Decision Making Protocol – User Guide
Reuben Woo
Decision Making Protocol
Reuben Woo’s Decision Making Protocol is based on his work at the Society of Rehabilitation and Crime Prevention, Hong Kong.  It was launched in early 2014 for internal staff training on clinical decision-making but later became the basis of a series of supervision groups for social workers from different fields of practice.

The Decision Making Protocol User Guide provides a comprehensive explanation of the 16-step process with a case example and a procedural guide for using the Decision Making Protocol in case conferences.
Download Values Based Practice Decision Making Protocol
Citation reference:
Woo Yan-wah, R., (2014) Values-based practice Decision Making Protocol – User Guide


The NIMHE Values Framework
The NIMHE Framework
NIMHE (National Institute for Mental Health England) was a UK government organization set up by the Department of Health in the first decade of this century to support implementation of mental health policy.

One of NIMHE’s first initiatives was to convene a small working party representing service users and a range of service providers to develop a framework of shared values to support its work. The Framework became the basis for a series of policy and service development programs combining values-based with evidence-based approaches (see Reading Guide).

Although produced in the context of a specific series of policy and practice initiatives the Framework itself and the process by which it was produced remain helpful exemplars for values-based mental health practice
Download The NIMHE Values Framework
For a more detailed account of how the Framework was developed and its contemporary relevance see:
Morgan A, Felton A, Fulford K. W. M, Kalathil J and Stacey G.
(forthcoming 2015). Values-based Practice, Chapter 4 in Values and Ethics: an Exploration for Mental Health Practice. Palmgrave Macmillan
Citation reference:
National Institute for Mental Health England (2004) The National Framework of Values for Mental Health. Originally published on-line on the NIMHE website. Available on the values-based practice website (valuesbasedpractice.org) or in hard copy at p25 in Woodbridge, K., and Fulford, K.W.M. (2004) ‘Whose Values?’ A workbook for values-based practice in mental health care. London: The Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health.


Policy Reports


VB CAHMs Commission Report

title-page

The report of the Commission for Values-based CAHMs (Child and Adolescent Mental Health System Commission) was launched on November 7th at a reception at the House of Lords hosted by Commission Chair Baroness Tyler

Among other findings the Commission emphasised the importance of building closer links between education and healthcare in the provision of services supporting the mental health of children and young people

 

The full report and a summary version can be downloaded here:
Download
Summary Values-Based Child and Adolescent Mental Health System Commission (2016)
Full-report Values-Based Child and Adolescent Mental Health System Commission (2016)

or via the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ website at:

www.rcpsych.ac.uk/mediacentre/pressreleases2016/vbcamhscommission.aspx

Citation reference: Values-Based Child and Adolescent Mental Health System Commission (2016) What Really Matters in Children and Young People’s Mental Health. London: Royal College of Psychiatrists.


The Anatomy of Collaboration 

This report is based on the findings from a series of Round Table seminars in the House of Lords organized by Collaborate at South Bank University in partnership with The Collaborating Centre

The paper argues that strong collaboration to support better citizen outcomes must be built on five components: leadership, values, infrastructure, delivery and behaviours, which are represented in the paper as parts of the body. All must be interwoven with the voice and influence of citizens. Failure to take the collaborative process seriously will result in the promise of integrated care and joined-up commissioning through devolution being wasted.

For more information see: ‘Anatomy of Collaboration’ launched by Collaborate with Oxford University Collaborating Centre and London South Bank University

The full report can be down loaded here: REPORT Collaborate_Anatomy-of-Collaboration-Digital-Report or from Collaborate’s website at: ADD http://wordpress.collaboratei.com/wp-content/uploads/Collaborate_Anatomy-of-Collaboration-Digital-Report.pdf

Citation reference: Henry Kippin and Bill Fulford (2016) The Anatomy of Collaboration: a Resource for Leaders in Health, Social Care and Beyond. Report based on House of Lords Roundtable Seminars co-organised by Collaborate and the Collaborating Centre for Values-based Practice. London, South Bank University: Collaborate


Literature Searching



VaST Values Search Tools: a manual for searching electronic databases for health-related values
Mila Petrova

How to Search Electronic DatabasesSearching for values-related literature is difficult for many reasons but notably because relevant search terms are not sufficiently specific (if you search on ‘value*’ you get millions of ‘hits’ on the lines of ‘the values of the hemoglobin’!)

Mila Petrova developed this manual working with Jeremy Dale, Paul Sutcliffe, Bill Fulford and others at Warwick Medical School. It includes a summary string of terms that is helpful as a values filter for a first-level search.

 

Download Manual Searching Electronic Databases
Further information on identifying literature on values is given in:
Fulford, K.W.M., Peile, E., and Carroll, H (2012) ‘A Smoking Enigma: getting and not getting the knowledge.’ Ch 6, pps 65 – 82 in Fulford, K.W.M., Peile, E., and Carroll, H Essentials of Values-based Practice: clinical stories linking science with people. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Citation reference:
Petrova, M., (2012) VaST Values Search Tools: a manual for searching electronic databases for health-related values.
The search string was published in:
Petrova, M., Sutcliffe, P., Fulford, K. W. M., and Dale, J. (2011) Search terms and a validated brief search filter to retrieve publications on health-related values in Medline: a word frequency analysis study. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, doi:10.1136/amiajnl-2011-000243.

Read More about literature searching at retrieving values-related literature