Soundscape with voice-hearers

 

What is it like to hear voices? For those who are not voice-hearers it could be hard to imagine what it is like to hear voices, so the soundscape explores this experience. We are interested in whether listening to sounds may be a therapeutic strategy for voice-hearers who are distressed by their voices. 

There have been a number of projects in secure hospitals in recent years where sound has been used very effectively to help voice-hearers find some relief from their symptoms. Sound therapists have used gongs, drums, singing bowls, voice and tuning forks in one-to-one treatment settings to deliver bespoke sessions, tailored to the needs of the individual. We have found that regular, weekly sessions can have a significant impact on the debilitating effects of intrusive voices and that many people develop inner strength and enhanced self esteem as a result of exposure to therapeutic sound. More research into this phenomenon is recommended so that a greater number of people might have access to this form of therapy.

To learn more  about the use of sounds as a therapeutic strategy you can listen to the Soundscape with voice-hearers podcast:

Listen to ‘Soundscape for voice hearers’

Soundscape for voice-hearers

Collaborators for ‘Soundscape with voice-hearers’. 

Dr Roz Austin, PhD, who is a health researcher, and Co-Lead of the Educational Voice-hearing Network in Oxford; Jane Ford, MA,  BVA, AOTOS, BAST, ABRSM who is a singing teacher, choral director and professional sound therapist; and Dr Tony Sellors, PhD, who is a Senior Producer at Radio 3, BBC.

We would like to thank the voice-hearers who took part in the Soundscape. We are grateful for generous funding from the Laces Trust, and from all those who made donations for this project via Crowdfunding.