Takaaki David Ito

Project Partner: Takaaki David Ito
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Takaaki David Ito
Professor (retired) of Clinical Spiritual Care, Graduate School of Applied Religious Studies / Institute of Grief Care, Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan

I have extensive practical experience working across faith traditions. Although I am a Christian, I was a chaplain in a Buddhist hospital until recently. My current research interests include the integration of spiritual care and the dialogical self theory (of Hubert Hermans, see below) and its links to our complex and often conflicting values and beliefs. I have co-authored a paper on the ABC model of multidisciplinary team work in cancer care. I am currently developing a medical humanities curriculum that can contribute to medical practice and education in Japan.

Preferred Contact

david.ito@hmc.ox.ac.uk

t.d.ito@sacra.or.jp

Location

Based in

Japan

Working in

United KingdomJapan

Areas of interest in VBP

Education, Research/philosophy, Services/person-centered, Services/Spiritual Care; Services/teamwork; Services/Grief Care

Related areas of interest

Ethics; Medical humanities/curriculum building; Other/chaplaincy in medicine/spiritual care;

Areas of healthcare expertise:

Spiritual Care, Chaplaincy

Publications

Naoto T. Ueno, T. David Ito, R. Kevin Grigsby, Melanie V. Black and Janis Apted. Nat. Rev. Clin. Oncol. 7, 544–547 (2010); published online 6 July 2010; doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2010.115


For my co-authored paper on the ABC conceptual model of effective multidisciplinary cancer care, see: Naoto T. Ueno, T. David Ito, R. Kevin Grigsby, Melanie V. Black and Janis Apted. Nat. Rev. Clin. Oncol. 7, 544–547 (2010); published online 6 July 2010; doi:10.1038/nrclinonc.2010.115


Read More

Hubert Hermans’ dialogical self theory


Hubert Hermans’ dialogical self theory conceives each person as a bundle of “I-positions”, “characters”, or “dividuals” (Keiichiro Hirano) in dialogue; metaphorically, each person seeks a polyphony (not monophony, nor even homophony). This polyphony is reflected in our complex and often conflicting values and beliefs.

For more on this, see: Hubert J.M. Hermans, Giancarlo Dimaggio (Eds.)The Dialogical Self in Psychotherapy: An Introduction. (Routledge 2016)